Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Analyzing Random Data:


Before we get to the random data, I wish to share something with you all. Out of the blue, I got a promo email from Grammarly.com, a website that offers an editing tool for writers. I am going to test it out on my unfinished novel next week, but I have already used it to test for plagiarism. I’m sure you agree that plagiarism is a rare concern for unpublished authors, but it can happen. That’s why I am happy to copy the following sentence into my blog entry (in exchange for something of value from the people at Grammarly.com), and complete that sentence as an advisory to you all, to remember when you are busy writing something new:

"I use Grammarly to check for plagiarism because I hate to discover, when it’s too late, that I’ve plagiarised myself."

The web is buzzing about a phony paper submitted to – and published by - a distinguished Romanian science journal. I am reading the entire paper – bits of it are terribly funny - but I suspect that most of you have better things to do. So I am providing you with one delicious excerpt. Please bear in mind that this phony paper was created to prove that a decent Romanian journal might publish anything. The article is about selecting methods of analysis randomly, in order to analyze random data and get results.

An Excerpt from:
EVALUATIONOF TRANSFORMATIVE HERMENEUTIC HEURISTICS FOR PROCESSING RANDOM DATA by Prof. PhD Dragan Z ĐUIRIĆ, Prof. PhD Boris DELILBAŠIĆ, Doctoral student
Stevica RADISIC

The first experimental results came from 2500 trial runs, and
were not reproducible. The next batch of results come from only 50
trial runs, and were not reproducible. Continuing with this rationale,
the many discontinuities in the graphs point to improved precision
introduced with our decision tree algorithms. Such a hypothesis at
first glance seems unexpected but fell in line with our expectations.
As hypothesized, the final run was sufficiently consistent, which shows
the useful convergence of our heuristics.

Incidentally, scholars are working on a gender-free term to replace "hermeneutics." Their work is so hush-hush, that if you search for himmeneutics or themmeneutics, Google will refer you only to hermeneutics. Try it...

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